Osha Attorneys
Osha Attorneys
Osha Attorneys
Osha Attorneys
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The collective expertise of our global team distinguishes OBWB in the field of Intellectual Property Law. We align our best resources to meet each client's specific needs and we treat each matter with the highest degree of attention and care.

12600 Hill Country Blvd.
Suite 275, Austin   TX 78738
P: 512.480.0667
F: 713.228.8778

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Osha Liang LLP
1200 Pearl St. Ste. 314
Boulder, CO   80302
P: 713.228.8600
F: 713.228.8778

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8/F, Hangzhou Kerry Center
385 Yan An Rd.
Hangzhou, China   310006
P: +86.571.2689.2537
F: +86.571.2689.2700

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Two Houston Center
909 Fannin
Suite 3500, Houston   TX 77010
P: 713.228.8600
F: 713.228.8778

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2 Rue de la Paix
75002 Paris, France
P: +33.1.4494.8630
F: +33.1.4494.8631

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Level 28 Shinagawa Intercity Tower A
2-15-1 Konan Minato-ku
Tokyo, Japan   108-6028
P: 81.3.6717.2877
F: 81.3.6717.2878

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1701 Pennsylvania Ave.
NW Suite 200
Washington, DC   20006
P: 713.228.8600
F: 713.228.8778

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Nicholas S. King, Ph.D.

Dr. King assists with prosecuting foreign and domestic patents in optical technologies, electronic and sensor systems, telecommunications, and nanotechnologies.

Dr. King earned his Ph.D. investigating new applications of optically active metallic nanoparticles.  He developed expertise in cleanroom fabrication techniques, semiconductor processing, nanoscale materials characterization (SEM, AFM, etc.), optical characterization (custom spectroscopic instruments), and scientific communications.


Prior to joining Osha Bergman Watanabe & Burton (OBWB), Dr. King worked as an R&D scientist at Proportional Technologies Inc., a developer and manufacturer of radiation detectors for science and defense applications (US National Laboratories, DARPA, and DTRA). As a member of the main engineering team, Dr. King collaborated with electrical and mechanical engineers to develop, build, and characterize gamma and neutron detector systems for custom applications such as cargo and personnel screening, networked mobile detectors, personnel dosimetry, imaging detectors, and spectroscopic systems.

AWARDS & RECOGNITION
  • Rice Quantum Institute Oral Presentation Award (2014)
  • Rice Quantum Institute Oral Presentation Award (2009)
  • Ciba Specialty Chemicals Corporation Undergraduate Scholarship (2004 – 2008)
PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES & MEMBERSHIP
  • Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Member (2015 – current)
  • American Chemical Society, Peer Reviewer for Nano Letters & ACS Nano (2014 – 2015)
  • SPIE Optics Society, Member (2009 – 2014)
  • SPIE Optics Society – Rice University Student Chapter, Officer (2009 – 2014)
  • Rice University, Ph.D., Condensed Matter Physics, 2015
  • Rice University, M.S., Condensed Matter Physics, 2011
  • Rice University, B.S., Physics, 2008
SELECTED PUBLICATIONS
  • Large-Area, Low-Cost, High-Efficiency Neuron Detector for Vehicle-Mounted Operation. Lacy et. al. IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci., 2016, (9499). DOI:10.1109/TNS.2016.2631451
  • Fano Resonant Aluminum Nanoclusters for Plasmonic Colorimetric Sensing. King et. al. ACS Nano, 2015, 9, 10628-10636. DOI: 1021/acsnano.5b04864
  • Charge Transfer Plasmons: Optical Conductances and Tunable Infrared Resonances. ACS Nano, 2015, 9 (6), 6428-6435. DOI: 1021/acsnano.5b02087
  • Aluminum Nanocrystals. McClain, et. al. Nano Letters, 2015, 15 (4), 2751-2755. DOI: 1021/acs.nanolett.5b00614
  • Vivid, full-color aluminum plasmonic pixels. Olson, et al. Proceeding of the National Academy of Sciences 2014 111 (40) 14348-14353. DOI: 1073/pnas.1415970111
  • Aluminum for plasmonics. King, et al. American Chemical Society Nano 2013 8 (1), 834-840. DOI: 1021/nn405495q
  • Orienting nanoantennas in three dimensions to control light scattering across a dielectric interface. King, et al. Nano Letters 2013 13 (12), 5996-6001. DOI: 10.1021/nl403199z
  • Narrowband photodetection in the near-infrared with a plasmon-induced hot electron device. Sobhani, et al. Nature Communications. 2013 4 (1643). DOI:10.1038/ncomms2642
  • Surface-enhanced infrared absorption using individual cross antennas tailored to chemical moieties. Brown, et al. Journal of the American Chemical Society 2013 135 (9), 3688-3695. DOI: 10.1021/ja312694g
  • Aluminum plasmonic nanoantennas. Knight, et al. Nano Letters 2012 12 (11), 6000-6004. DOI: 1021/nl303517v
  • Angle- and spectral-dependent light scattering from plasmonic nanocups. King, et al. American Chemical Society Nano 2011 5 (9), 7254-7262. DOI: 1021/nn202086u
  • Shot noise suppression at room temperature in atomic-scale Au junctions. Wheeler, et al. Nano Letters 2010 10 (4), 1287-1292. DOI: 1021/nl904052r
SELECTED PRESENTATIONS
  • IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium and Medical Imaging Conference 2017. Atlanta, GA (Oct 2017)
  • Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) Industry Day. San Antonio, Texas (June 2017)
  • Symposium on Radiation Measurement and Acquisition (SORMA West). Berkeley, California (May 2016)
  • US Defense Intelligence Agency Industry Day. Charlottesville, Virginia. (Feb 2016)
  • Rice Quantum Institute Colloquium. Houston, Texas. (Aug 2009-2014)
  • Gordon Research Conference (GRC) – Plasmonics. Newry, Maine. (Jul 2014)
  • Surface Plasmon Polariton Conference (SPP6). Ottawa, Ontario. (Jun 2013)
  • US Department of Energy – Center for Advanced Solar Photophysics. Aurora, Colorado. (Jan 2012)
  • SPIE Optics+Photonics. San Diego, CA (Aug 2011)
  • US Department of Energy – Center for Advanced Solar Photophysics. Los Alamos, New Mexico. (Aug 2011)